Kisumu Impala Cover PIC Beads Safaris Collection

Birding and Walking with Impalas at Kisumu Impala Sanctuary

I was delighted to be back at Kisumu Impala Sanctuary, and it truly did not disappoint. As we entered the gate, an African-pied Wagtail seemed to lead the way along the main path. We made a brief stopover to read the park rules and regulations and the ranger reminded us to adhere to them.

A pair of hadada ibis seemed to announce our arrival as they flew to Albizia Picnic Site that was rather quiet and peaceful with very few visitors. Our guide and designated ranger explained that the sanctuary was established in 1987 as a home for impalas that were roaming in Kisumu and was placed under the management of the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) in 1992 following its gazettement.

The sanctuary occupies a small area of 0.34 square kilometres and is a remnant of an indigenous forest along the shoreline of the lake consisting of three types of vegetation including: marine, savanna and grassland. Following the park’s theme, it is genuinely a lakeshore walk with impalas; we saw numerous breeding and bachelor herds of impalas. We spotted a dramatic scene where two male impalas play fighting and charging at each other.

Burchell’s zebra and Masai giraffes seems to enjoy each others company as they criss-crossed along the main path to browse for food. A bee-eater flew past us and perched on the canopy of a sausage tree that provided the much needed shade for the mid-day sun.

We walked past the Sunset Picnic Site, State Lodge Campsite, Simba Picnic Site, Impala Picnic Site and made a brief stopover at the Railway Trail for some photos and later the Baboon Picnic Site. Public washrooms are strategically positioned for use and signage has been used appropriately placed for ease throughout the sanctuary.

We made a courtesy visit to Jambo Impala Eco-lodge that is located on the shores of the lake. As we left the park, a fellow birder, Jeen drew my attention to a Kingfisher, upon closer look we saw it feeding on another bird, looking through my binoculars I saw it was a female sunbird though it was challenging to identify the specific species.

We left the kingfisher enjoying its meal as we were running out of time and had to rush for our continued journey to Mbita and overnight stay at Rusinga Island Lodge. We left happy with a birds checklist of 23 species spotted under two hours.

Contact Beads Safaris Collection for city tours, birding trips and cultural excursions to Kisumu and Nyanza region via info@beadsafariscollection.co.ke today.

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